PASI Workshop

PASI Workshop



2013 Pan American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) on Atmospheric Processes in Latin America and the Caribbean: Observations, Analysis, and Impacts

Cartagena, Colombia
27 May - 7 June 2013

Lecturers

John J. Braun: Dr. Braun is a Project Scientist at the UCAR COSMIC Program Office where he is leading the ground based research activities of the group. Dr. Braun is a Co-Investigator of COCONet, serving as the atmospheric lead for the project. His research interests include remote sensing of the Earth and its atmosphere using GNSS, the water cycle, and improving observations for initializing numerical weather models. He is a member of the International GNSS Service Tropospheric Working Group, the Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) satellite in-situ calibration/validation team, and the WMO Global Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) GNSS PW Task Team.

Attendee Information
Shuyi Chen: Shuyi Chen is a Professor of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) of the University of Miami (UM). She is a widely published author whose work focusing on the dynamics and air-sea interactions in tropical convection and cyclones. Prof. Chen leads a research group at UM that has developed a new generation fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model for coastal and hurricane research and prediction. She has been a lead scientist on several global tropical cyclone research programs, among them: the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST); the successful Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) using three Doppler radar aircraft collecting unprecedented in-situ data in Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Ophelia in 2005; and the largest international program to study typhoons in the West Pacific, Impact of Typhoons on Ocean in Pacific (ITOP) in 2010. She is also a lead aircraft scientist in the DYNAMO field campaign collecting data over the Indian Ocean to improve our knowledge of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and its impacts on global weather. She is now working with a team of scientists focusing on understanding the impact of oil spill on the environment in the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Chen is a recipient of the NASA's Group Award on Tropical Convection Program. She served as an Editor for Weather and Forecasting journal of the American Meteorological Society. She is a member of the National Academies' Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC) and a Fellow of American Meteorological Society.

Attendee Information
Dra. Ana María Durán-Quesada is an associate professor in the School of Physics and researcher in the Center for Geophysical Research, both at the University of Costa Rica. Her research interests include tropospheric moisture and water vapor transport, low level jets, Lagrangian dynamics, air-sea interaction in the tropics, water cycle at the different scales, numerical climate modeling and troposphere-stratosphere water vapor exchange. Her current research is focused on the characterization of the hydrological cycle of tropical forests and response to climate forcing, terrestrial hydrological cycle simulations, seasonal climate variability modeling and the Caribbean low level jet dynamics.

Attendee Information
Dr. Lisa Goddard: Dr. Lisa Goddard is the Director of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) and an adjunct associate professor within the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences of Columbia University. She has been involved in El Nino and climate forecasting research and operations since the mid 1990s. She has extensive experience in forecasting methodology and has published papers on El Nino, seasonal climate forecasting and verification, and probabilistic climate change projections. Currently leading the IRI's effort on Near-Term Climate Change, Dr. Goddard oversees research and product development aimed at providing climate information at the 10-20 year horizon and how that low frequency variability and change interacts with the probabilistic risks and benefits of seasonal-to-interannual variability. Most of Dr. Goddard's research focuses on diagnosing and extracting meaningful information from climate models and available observations. She also developed and oversees a new national post-doctoral program, the Post-docs Applying Climate Expertise Program (PACE), which explicitly links recent climate PhDs with decision making institutions. In addition, Dr. Goddard sits on five scientific advisory panels and co-chairs two working groups. Dr. Goddard holds a Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from Princeton University and a B.A. in physics from the University of California at Berkeley.

Attendee Information
Olga L. Mayol-Bracero: Dr. Mayol-Bracero is an Associate Professor in the Institute for Tropical Ecosystem Studies, Department of Environmental Science at the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras and a member of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) scientific steering committee. Her research activities in the area of atmospheric aerosols include: (1) the chemical, physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols and the impact of these aerosols on climate, ecosystem, and the degradation of structures, (2) size-resolved chemical composition and sources of aerosols in tropical regions (African dust, biomass burning, marine, urban, biogenic), (3) carbonaceous aerosols, and (4) organic aerosols and their role in cloud condensation nuclei properties. She has been involved in large aerosol field projects such as INDOEX, LBA EUSTACH, LBA CLAIRE, LBA SMOCC, RICO, ICE-T and Fennec. Presently, she is the PI of the NSF funded project Puerto Rico African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS) and the manager of Cape San Juan Atmospheric Aerosols Observatory. In October 2011, Dr. Mayol-Bracero organized the "First International Workshop on the Long- Range Transport and Impacts of African Dust to the Americas". This was a very successful event with attendance of more than 100 participants, including scientists and students, from different parts of the world (e.g., Mexico, Dominican Republic, Martinique, Cuba, Israel, Denmark, Germany, France, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA, Puerto Rico). One of the results of the workshop was the article entitled "Improving our understanding of African dust transport using the Caribbean Basin as the receptor" (Prospero and Mayol-Bracero, 2012). Dr. Mayol-Bracero will participate in the application selection process, help refine the course content, and participate as a lecturer.

Attendee Information
Héctor Mora-Páez: Mr. Mora Páez is a manager in the Center for Processing and Analysis of Geodetic Data, Earth's Deformation Group, Colombian Geological Survey (formerly INGEOMINAS). He serves as director of the GEORED project, a national GNSS network in Colombia focused on understanding solid earth natural hazards in the region. Mr. Mora Páez has a M.S. from the University of South Carolina. He is an internationally recognized leader in advanced applications of GNSS instrumentation for geodesy.

Attendee Information
Ángel G. Muñoz: Ángel Muñoz is the Scientific Coordinator of the Latin American Observatory, a regional initiative aimed at monitoring climate variables and providing useful forecast products for decision makers in the Latin American countries. Muñoz's research interests are climate physics, computational modeling, forecast methodologies and climate change and variability. Presently, he is Graduate Research Fellow at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) - Columbia University in New York City.

Attendee Information
Carolina Vera: Carolina Vera is the Director of the Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences (CIMA) and UMI/IFAECI, joint institute between the University of Buenos Aires (UBA), Argentina National Council of Sciences (CONICET) and CNRS (France). Also she is Full Professor of the School of Exact and Natural Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and Principal Researcher (CONICET).

She is currently Officer Member of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) Joint Scientific Committee. She is also member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Inter-American Institute for Global Change (IAI), and she has been the Co-Chair of the WCRP/CLIVAR Panel for the Variability of the American Monsoon Systems (VAMOS), Chair of the American Meteorological Society STAC Committee for Meteorology and Oceanography of the Southern Hemisphere, and Chair of the Scientific Committee of the South American Low-Level Jet experiment (SALLJEX). She has been Lead Author of the IPCC Special Report on "Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation" (SREX).


Attendee Information
Doug Wilson: Doug Wilson retired from a career as a NOAA physical oceanographer in June 2012 and presently has a consulting company, Caribbean Wind LLC, supporting ocean observing projects in the Chesapeake Bay, Mid-Atlantic, and Caribbean Sea. He spent 19 years at the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami, FL, conducting research on Indian Ocean monsoon currents, ENSO ocean dynamics, and circulation of the Western Tropical Atlantic and Caribbean Sea. He spent the next 11 years at the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office in Annapolis, MD, where he most recently designed and deployed the Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy System (CBIBS). He presently serves as Project Coordinator of the GOOS Regional Alliance for the Caribbean, and on the Board of Directors of the U.S. Regional Observing System for the Mid-Atlantic, MARACOOS. He was recently awarded the 2013 Francis W. Reichelderfer Award by the American Meteorology Society, given in recognition of distinguished contributions to the provision of operational environmental services to the public.

Attendee Information
Tom Yoksas: Unidata Software Engineer - Development and Support Group


Sponsors and Acknowledgements

This short course is funded by the United States National Science Foundation under grant OISE-1242281. NOAA (award #NA06OAR4310119) and the Colombian Geological Survey provides additional support.


COSMIC UCAR NSF SGC COCONet


NOAA DIMAR UNAVCO Colombian Naval Academy



The above image shows the total column precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from COCONet overlaid upon a GOES infrared satellite image on October 23, 2012 at 20:15 UTC as Tropical Storm Sandy was increasing in intensity in the Caribbean Sea.